Encyclopedia Of Forlorn Places

Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati, Ohio

Glencoe-Auburn Place, Cincinnati

Cincinnati has one the best collections of 19th century buildings west of the Appalachians. The architectural style of the 19th century buildings in Cincinnati is unique to that city and the mid Ohio Valley. Unfortunately many of Cincinnati's historic neighborhoods are trashed. There are abandoned buildings scattered throughout central Cincinnati and demolitions of historic buildings happen on a regular basis. New Orleans, Cincinnati and Saint Louis were the largest cities West of the Appalachians in the first half of the 1800s. New Orleans, in spite of it's recent hurricane problems remains the best preserved of the three.

My first stop on a recent visit to Cincinnati was to Glencoe-Auburn Place (pictured above). Unfortunately the historic development at Glencoe-Auburn Place had already been demolished by the time I got there. You can read about what was demolished here and here.

Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio

After a quick stop in the amazing but still distressed Over-The-Rhine neighborhood, I went to look at what survives of the historic industrial/warehouse corridor along Spring Grove Avenue. Many or most of the old buildings in this district have been demolished over the years but a few interesting ones are still standing.

Finally, I headed out of town past the massive Proctor & Gamble complex to see the Crisco and jam factories (below).

Cincinnati

P&G, Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

P&G, Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

P&G, Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

P&G, Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

P&G, Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati

Lockland, Ohio

Cincinnati

Lockland, Ohio